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Sunday, November 14

Jane Austen Etiquette Throwdown

In your estimation, which of Marianne's etiquette faux pas in Sense and Sensibility was most egregious?

Willoughby cuts a lock of Marianne's hair

Which of Marianne's etiquette faux pas was most egregious?
Allowing her rudeness to show to people she dislikes.
Allowing Willoughby to cut a lock of her hair.
Visiting Allenham alone with Willoughby.
Mocking Colonel Brandon, Mrs. Jennings and the Middletons behind their backs.
Accepting the gift of a horse from Willoughby.
Writing letters to Willoughby when she arrives in London.
Making a spectacle of herself when she sees Willoughby at the ball.

  
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Marianne accepts the gift of a horse from Willoughby

5 comments:

Jean at The Delightful Repast said...

As a freelancer who writes frequently about etiquette, I must say that this young lady's faux pas are so numerous I cannot choose but one! Tsk tsk! (said while fanning myself)

Susan said...

I have a soft spot for Marianne but...

anyway, I chose the gift horse (ha)...a close second is rudeness to those she dislikes.

About the letters in London & the ball: everyone, no matter what year & what circumstance has had meltdowns over less-than-worthies. At some point, esp. when so young & of a certain temperment.

So count me out as a tsk-tsker. (Sorry Jean above, I am sure you're utterly correct, but I vote for big deals. Like accepting large gifts from people one barely knows.)

Cheers.

Nonna Beach said...

Going unaccompanied is the worst (and most dangerous ) followed by all the faux pas bad manners ( no excuse for those ) then the lock of hair, the horse etc.

stephpers said...

Going unaccompanied to his home was a tremendous faux pas in my book. It showed a lack of respect for her mother and careless regard for her sisters reputations.

Katxena said...

I was torn between her visit to Allenham and the horse. Both demonstrated her lack of regard for the real, practical needs of her mother and sisters. The visit to Allenham could have ruined her sisters' reputations and what limited prospects they had, and could have cost the family the support of the Middleton's. The horse could have literally eaten them out of house and home. The other incidents were thoughtless and self-centered, but these two could have left the family in dire straights. Ultimately, I picked the horse, but only because Sir John loves a story.